self-portrait - A portrait an artist makes using himself or herself as its subject, typically drawn or painted from a reflection in a mirror.


Examples:

Listed chronologically by artist's birth year

 

Use ctrl-F (PC) or command-F (Mac) to search for a name

 

 

see thumbnail to rightJean Fouquet (French, c. 1420 -c. 1477-1481), Self-Portrait, c. 1450, painted enamel on copper, diameter 6.8 cm, Louvre.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftAlbrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528), three self-portraits, including Self-Portrait at Twenty-Seven, 1498, oil on wood panel, 20 1/2 x 16 1/8 inches (52 x 41 cm), Prado Museum, Madrid. Also see German art and Northern Renaissance.

 

 

Raffaello Sanzio (Italian, 1483-1520), "Raphael", The School of Athens, 1510-11, fresco, height 25 feet, Stanza della Segnatura, Vatican, Rome. Many art historians believe that Raphael placed a self-portrait at the far right in this large composition. He is thought to have painted Plato — the man with the white beard in the center of the picture — with a likeness to Leonardo da Vinci. The man who is seated, in the near left of center appears to be a likeness of Michelangelo. Euclid looks like the architect Bramante; another man resembles Raphael's painting master, Perugino. See Renaissance.

 

 

Lucas van Leyden (Dutch, 1494-1533), Self-Portrait in a flat hat, no date, engraving, image 17.4 x 14.1 cm, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightPieter Bruegel (Netherlandish, 1525?-1569), Artist and Connoisseur, 1565, pen and ink on paper, 25 x 22 cm, Graphische Sammlung Albertina, Vienna. See connoisseur and Northern Renaissance.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftSofonisba Anguissola (Italian, c. 1535-1625), Self-Portrait, c. 1555, oil on parchment, 3 1/4 x 2 1/2 inches (8.2 x 6.3 cm), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The artist holds a medallion inscribed in Latin around the rim: "The maiden Sofonisba Anguissola, depicted by her own hand, from a mirror, at Cremona." Inside the circle is a cryptogram whose entwined letters are included in the name of Anguissola's father, Amilcare. The meaning and original purpose of this enigmatic portrait remain a mystery. See Baroque, circle, cryptic, feminism and feminist art, miniature, mirror, and oval.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightPeter Paul Rubens (Flemish, 1577-1640), Rubens, His Wife Helena Fourment (1614-1673), and Their Son Peter Paul (born 1637), probably late 1630s, oil on wood panel, 80 1/4 x 62 1/4 inches (203.8 x 158.1 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. (On the Met's page, you can enlarge any detail.) See Baroque.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftAnthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599-1641), Self-Portrait, oil on canvas, 116.5 x 93.5 cm, Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAnthony van Dyck, Self-Portrait, c. 1630, etching, 9 1/2 x 6 1/8 inches (24.1 x 15.6 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftDiego Velázquez (Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez) (Spanish, 1599-1660), The Luncheon (Three Men at a Table), c. 1617/18, oil on canvas, 43 x 40 inches (108.5 x 102 cm), Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. The young man on the far right is thought to be a self-portrait of Velazquez.

 

 

 

 

 

Diego Velázquez (Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez) (Spanish, 1599-1660), The Family of Philip IV, or "The Maids of Honor (Las Meninas)", c. 1656, oil on canvas, (318 x 276 cm), Prado Museum, Madrid.

This is a group portrait of an exceptional sort:

 

In the center-foreground is the see thumbnail to leftinfanta (princess) attended by her meninas (maids of honor) — companions including two young ladies, a dwarf, a child, a dog, a nun, and a tutor.

 

This little party is visiting the studio where Velázquez stands before his canvas. We see the back of it, perched upon an easel. The painter and most of the others look toward the king and queen as they pose for the painting in progress.

 

see thumbnail to leftThe king and queen would not actually be visible in this picture if their reflected image could not be seen in a mirror placed on the opposite wall. Altogether this is a view, which could only be seen by the king and queen themselves, as they pose for their portrait. The point of view of every person who gazes upon this painting is that of the king and queen of Spain. A very privileged vantage indeed! See Baroque, genre, and Spanish art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (Dutch, 1606-1669), Self-Portrait at Twenty-Two , 1628, oil on panel, 22.6 x 18.7 cm, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. See chiaroscuro and shadow.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (Dutch, 1606-1669), Self-Portrait with Beret and Gold Chain, 1630-1, oil on wood panel, 69.7 x 57cm, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. See beret.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Self-Portrait at an Open Window, 1648, etching, 16 x 13 cm, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Self-Portrait, 1658, oil on canvas, 52 5/8 x 40 7/8 inches (133.7 x 103.8 cm), Frick Collection, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Self-Portrait as St. Paul, 1661, oil on canvas,  91 x 77 cm, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftWilliam Hogarth (English, 1697-1764), The Painter and his Pug, 1745, oil on canvas, 90.0 x 69.9 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightJean-Baptiste Siméon Chardin (French, 1699-1779), Self-Portrait in Spectacles, 1771, pastel, on blue-gray paper over canvas, 16 x 13 inches (40.7 x 32.5 cm), Louvre. See easel and Rococo.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftSir Joshua Reynolds (English, 1723-1792), Self-Portrait when Young, 1753-58, oil on canvas, 73.7 x 61.6 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightMatthew Pratt (American, 1734-1805), The American School, 1765, oil on canvas, 36 x 50 1/4 inches (91.4 x 127.6 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. Benjamin West, standing to the left, examines a drawing held by Matthew Pratt, This picture depicts a scene in West's London studio. The identities of the other artists portrayed in the picture remains uncertain. See West's self-portrait below.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightHenry Fuseli (English, born Switzerland, 1741-1825), Self-Portrait as a Faun [verso: Head of a Woman Three-Quarters to Left ], pencil and chalk on paper, 32.2 x 42.7 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See drawing and Romanticism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAdélaïde Labille-Guiard (French, 1749-1803), Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, Mademoiselle Marie Gabrielle Capet (1761-1818) and Mademoiselle Carreaux de Rosemond (died 1788), 1785, oil on canvas, 83 x 59 1/2 inches (210.8 x 151.1 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftLouise-Elizabeth Vigée-Lebrun (French, 1755-1842), Self-Portrait, oil on canvas, oval, 25 1/4 x 21 inches (64.1 x 53.3 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See feminism and feminist art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightLéopold Boilly (French, 1761-1845), Grimacing Man (Self-Portrait), c. 1822-23, conté crayons on paper, collection of Karen B. Cohen. See caricature, expression, and Neoclassicism.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMarie-Denise Villers (French, 1774-1821), Young Woman Drawing, 1801, oil on canvas, 63 1/2 x 50 5/8 inches (161.3 x 128.6 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. Although it is not known for certain if this is a self-portrait, it might be. See Neoclassicism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightCopy after Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (French, 19th century), Ingres (1780-1867) as a Young Man, oil on canvas, 34 x 27 1/2 inches (86.4 x 69.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See Neoclassicism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftWilliam-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825-1905), Self-Portrait, 1879, oil on canvas, 46.5 x 38.5 cm.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightCamille Pissarro (French, 1830-1903), Self-Portrait, 1903, oil on canvas, 41.0 x 33.3 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See Impressionism.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftHilaire Germain Edgar Degas (French, 1834-1917), Self-Portrait, about 1857-1858, oil on paper, laid down on canvas, 8 1/8 x 6 1/2 inches (20.6 x 15.9 cm), J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, CA. See Impressionism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightJohn La Farge (American, 1835-1910), Portrait of the Painter, 1859, oil on wood panel, 16 1/16 x 11 1/2 inches (40.8 x 29.2 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftHenri [Ignace-Henri-Jean-Théodore] Fantin-Latour (French, 1836-1904), Self-Portrait, 1860, oil on canvas, 31.4 x 254 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See Batignolles Group.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightPaul Cézanne (French, 1839-1906), Self-Portrait in a Beret (Autoportrait au béret), 1898-1900, oil on canvas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. See beret, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926, active in France), Portrait of the Artist, 1878, gouache on wove paper laid down to buff-colored wood pulp paper, 23 5/8 x 16 3/16 inches (60.1 x 41.2 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See Impressionism and feminist art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightThomas Eakins (American, 1844-1916), Self-Portrait, 1902, oil on canvas, 30 x 25 inches, National Academy of Design, NY. See realism.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftEugène Carrière (French, 1849-1906), Self-Portrait, c. 1893, oil on canvas, 16 1/4 x 12 7/8 inches (41.3 x 32.7 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightVincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), Self-Portrait with a Straw Hat; (verso) The Potato Peeler, oil on canvas, 16 x 12 1/2 inches (40.6 x 31.8 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftVincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), Self-Portrait, 1889, oil on canvas, 25 1/2 x 21 1/4 inches (65 x 54 cm), Musée d'Orsay, Paris, F 626. See Post-Impressionism and other self-portraits by van Gogh.

 

 

Paul Gauguin (French, 1848-1903), Portrait of the Artist with the Idol, c. 1893, oil on canvas, 17 1/4 x 12 7/8 inches (43.8 x 32.7 cm), McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, TX.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightPaul Gauguin, Self-Portrait, c. 1893-1894, [210 k,] oil on canvas, 18 1/8 x 15 inches (46 x 38 cm), Musée d'Orsay, Paris. See Post-Impressionism.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftEdvard Much (Norwegian, 1863-1944), Self-Portrait, 1895, lithograph, 45 x 32 cm, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Iran. See Expressionism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightPierre Bonnard (French, 1867-1947), Self-Portrait in the Bathroom Mirror, 1939-1945, oil on canvas, 73 x 51 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris. See Intimisme and mirror.

 

 

Käthe Kollwitz (German, 1867-1945). See Expressionism and feminism and feminist art.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftJohn Sloan (American, 1871-1951), Self-Portrait, Working, 1916, oil, Windsor & Newton Copal Varnish, wax finish on canvas, Hood Museum, Dartmout Collebe, VT. See Ashcan School and The Eight.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightLewis Wickes Hine (American, New York, 1874-1940), Self-Portrait with Newsboy, 1908, gelatin silver print, 5 7/16 x 4 21/32 inches (13.9 x 11.8 cm), J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, CA. See photography.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftPaula Modersohn-Becker (German, 1876-1907), Self-Portrait, Half-Figure with Amber Necklace II (Selbstbildnis als Halbakt mit Bernsteinkette II), Summer of 1906, oil on canvas, 61 x 50 cm, Kunstmuseum, Basel, Switzerland. See Expressionism, feminism and feminist art, and German art.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightJames Montgomery Flagg (American, 1877-1960), I Want You for U.S. Army, 1917, chromolithograph, 39 1/2 x 29 1/8 inches (100.4 x 73.8 cm), National Museum of American Art. Flagg's version of Uncle Sam is a self-portrait. This poster was used for recruitment during World War I and again during World War II. See icon.

 

 

André Derain (French, 1880-1954), Portrait of the Artist, about 1912-1914, oil on canvas, 45 3/4 x 35 inches, Minneapolis Institute of Arts. See Fauvism and Cubism.

 

 

Hans Hofmann (American, 1880-1966), Self-Portrait with Brushes, casein on plywood, 1942, André Emmerich Gallery, New York City.

 

 

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1972), Self-Portrait, 1899-1900, charcoal on paper, Museo Picasso, Barcelona.

 

 

Pablo Picasso, Self-Portrait: Yo Picasso, 1901, oil on canvas, private collection. It sold for $47 million in 1989, a sum second only to the $53.9 fetched by van Gogh's Irises. Picasso painted numerous self-portraits.

 

 

Pablo Picasso, Self-Portrait, 1907, oil on canvas, National Gallery, Prague.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightStanislaw Ignacy (Witkacy) Witkiewicz (Polish, 1885-1939), Self-Portrait, 1927, pastel on paper, 65.0 x 49.0 cm, Galeria Witkacego. See Polish art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftPaul Manship (American, 1886-1966), Self-Portrait, 1906-1907, National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C. See Art Deco.

 

 

Ivan Le Lorraine Albright (American, 1897-1983), Self-Portrait in Georgia, 1967, 1967-68, oil on panel, 20 X 16 inches (50.80 x 40.64 cm), Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH. See grotesque.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightJohn Steuart Curry (American, 1897-1946), Self-Portrait, 1928, charcoal, conté crayon and pencil on paper, sheet: 25 5/16 x 19 3/8 inches (64.3 x 49.1 cm), National Museum of American Art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftM.C. (Maurits Cornelis) Escher (Dutch, 1898-1972), Self-Portrait, 1922, woodcut. See optical illusion and tessellation.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightM.C. (Maurits Cornelis) Escher, Self-Portrait, 1929, lithograph.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRaphael Soyer (American, 1899-1987), Self-Portrait, 1950, oil on canvas, 24 1/2 x 20 1/8 inches, National Academy of Design, NY. See Jewish art.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightHerbert Bayer (Austrian, 1900-1985, worked in USA), Self-Portrait in Mirror, 1932, gelatin-silver print, 13 7/16 x 9 3/4 inches (34.13 x 24.77 cm). See mirror, photography, and Surrealism.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftWilliam Henry Johnson (American, 1901-1970), Self-Portrait, 1929, Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C. See Harlem Renaissance.

 

 

 

Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907-1954), My Grandparents, My Parents, and I (Family Tree), 1936, oil and tempera on metal panel, 12 1/8 x 13 5/8 inches (30.7 x 34.5 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY. See feminism and feminist art. See feminism and feminist art and Mexican art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftFrida Kahlo, Self-Portrait Dedicated to Leon Trotsky, 1937, oil on board, 30 x 24 inches, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.

 

 

 

Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair, 1940, oil on canvas, 15 3/4 x 11 inches (40 x 27.9 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftBalthus (born Balthasar Klossowski de Rola) (French, 1908-2001), The Painter and His Model, 1980-1981, casein and tempera on canvas, 226.5 x 230.5 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris. See model.

 

 

 

Lee Krasner (American, 1908-1984), Self-Portrait, c. 1930, oil on linen, 30 1/8 x 25 1/8 inches, Estate of Lee Krasner. See Abstract Expressionism and feminism and feminist art.

 

 

Jacob Lawrence (American, 1917-2000), Self-Portrait, 1977, gouache on paper, 22 1/8 x 30 inches, National Academy of Design, NY. See African American art.

 

 

Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Self-Portrait, 1979, instant color print, 50.8 x 61 cm (20 x 24 inches), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

Andy Warhol, Last Self-Portrait, 1986, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 80 x 80 inches (203.2 x 203.2 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftClaes Oldenburg (American, born Sweden, 1929-), Self-Portrait, 1958, lithographic crayon on paper, 11 3/4 x 9 inches (29.8 x 22.8 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.

 

 

 

Daniel Spoerri (Swiss, 1930-), Daniel Isaac Spoerri-Feinstein, 1977, lithograph on paper, 89.0 x 59.6 cm, Tate Gallery, London. The subject: the pages of the artist's well-used passport. See Fluxus.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftPeter Blake (English, 1932-), Self-Portrait with Badges, 1961, oil on board, 1743 x 1219 mm, Tate Gallery, London. See English art and Pop Art.

 

 

 

Gerhard Richter (German, 1932-), Self-Portrait, Three Times, 24.1.90, 1990, oil on photograph, 50.0 x 60.0 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See German art.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftChuck Close (American, 1940-), Study for Self-Portrait, 1968, gelatin-silver print, ink, pencil, and pressure-sensitive tape on board, 18 5/8 x 13 3/8 inches (47.2 x 33.9 cm). See Photo-Realism.

 

 

 

 

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait, 1997, color instant print (Polaroid) mounted on foam core with tape, ink, felt-tipped pen, graphite and oil paint on board, 36 x 24 inches (91.2 x 61 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftChuck Close, Self-Portrait, 1997, oil on canvas, 8 feet 6 inches x 7 feet (259.1 x 213.4 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.

 

 

Yolanda López (American, 1942-), Portrait of the Artist as the Virgin of Guadalupe, 1978, oil pastel on paper, 32 x 24 inches, collection of the artist. See Chicana art and feminism and feminist art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to right"Gilbert and George" Gilbert Proesch and George Passmore (English, 1943- and 1942-), A Portrait of the Artists as Young Men, 1972, video installation, Tate Gallery, London. See collaboration.

 

 

Gary Hill (American, 1951-), Inasmuch as it is Always Already Taking Place, 1990, 16 channel video installation (NTSC, black-and-white, sound) with 16 modified video monitors, synchronizer, and niche, collection of the artist. Sixteen picture tubes in various sizes are loosely arrayed in a jumble, and housed within a deep horizontal alcove at chest level. Each screen displays an image of a portion of the artist's body -- an upturned ear, a curled spine, a heaving chest -- magnified and bathed in a soft, blue glow. The spare movements of each bodily fragment are accompanied by the gentle sounds of rustling paper, hushed phrases, and the rubbing of skin, repeating endlessly in a closed loop.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMontien Boonma (Thai, 1953-2000), Self-Portrait: A Man Who Admires Thai Art, 1982, photograph altered with decorative patterns drawn in colored ink. "The results transform his image into a traditional Thai theater mask while also giving it a smirky, challenging version of the welcoming "Siamese smile" of tourist industry cliché," said Holland Carter, New York Times, Feb. 21, 2003.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightNan Goldin (American, 1953-), Nan one month after being battered, 1984, photograph on paper, 69.5 x 101.5 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See feminist art and Jewish art.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftNan Goldin, Self-Portrait on the train, Germany, 1992, photograph on paper, 69.5 x 101.5 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightCindy Sherman (American, 1954-), Untitled A, 1975, photograph on paper, 41.4 x 28.3 cm, Tate Gallery, London. Since the mid-1970s, Sherman has photographed herself, not to make self-portraits, but to picture herself posing as characters she has invented. She has made many series of such photos, in which she has transformed herself through the use of cosmetics, costumes, hairstyles, body language and facial expressions. See model.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftCindy Sherman, Untitled B, 1975, photograph on paper, 41.8 x 28.2 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightCindy Sherman, Untitled D, 1975, photograph on paper, 41.4 x 28.4 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftCindy Sherman, Untitled, 1982, photograph on paper, 115.0 x 76.0 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightTony Oursler (American, 1957-), MMPI (Self-Portrait in Yellow), 1996, video installation with video projector, VCR, video tape, small cloth figure and metal chair, Milwaukee Art Museum, WI. MMPI stands for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, a diagnostic tool developed in the 1950s as a test for mental health. It is based on the discovery that individuals with similar mental disorders frequently answer the same questions in similar ways. A projection of the artist's head is seen pinned beneath the overturned chair, as he answers one of the test's questions after another.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftTim Hawkinson (American, 1960-), Balloon Self-Portrait, 2004?, latex sculpture, life size cast from the artist's body, turned inside out, then inflated by an air compressor, Ace Gallery, NYC.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightSandra Scolnik (American, 1968-), Self-Portrait, Undeveloped, 2000, oil on wood panel, 15 x 14 3/4 inches, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO.

 

 

 

 

Related Links:

 

 

Also see ala and alar groove, bust, imagines, philtrum, portrait, septum, and statue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ArtLex Art Dictionary

http://www.artlex.com
Copyright © 1996-current year