ArtLex Art Dictionary

 

 

 

screen - A framed construction used as a room divider or a decorative panel.

"Screen" might also refer to a fine grid or lattice, manufactured in many grades of mesh, in order to act like a filter or seive, separating material of various sizes by allowing passage of smaller particles, disallowing passage of larger particles.

Wire and plastic screens are commonly used in windows.

Sand can be sifted (refined) by passing it through screens in order to remove other materials, and to separate particles into various standard sizes, or to remove it from clay, etc.

Similarly, a screen can be used to remove debris from paints, solvents, and other liquids.

A screen typically forms the pulp-restraining surface of a deckle used in papermaking.

In printing, a glass plate marked off with crossing lines, placed before the lens of a camera when photographing for halftone reproduction. "Screen" can also refer to silkscreen printing — a process in which a screen supports all the components of a stencil, maintining their arrangement as inks pass through the screen.

Also, the white or silver surface onto which a picture is projected for viewing, or to show or project (a movie, for example) onto a screen.

By extension, because the face of a monitor is such a screen, any image of the full area of a monitor is called a screen image, or simply a screen.

 

Examples of screens in the first sense:

 

 

see thumbnail to rightFrench, Choir screen with the Crucifixion at the Cathedral at Naumburg, c. 1245, stone. Inside a Gothic cathedral, the nave was usually separated from the choir by a large stone choir screen, called a 'pulpitum' or 'jubé', which excluded the lay public from the liturgy performed behind it. The screens at Chartres and Amiens were later removed, but at Naumburg a superbly carved example from the middle of the thirteenth century has remained intact.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftIndia, Mughal; found at/reportedly from Fatehpur Sikri, India, Jali screen, one of a pair, second half of the 16th century, carved red sandstone, 73 1/4 x 51 3/16 x 3 9/16 inches (186 x 130 x 9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAttributed to Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1589/90-1651), The Old Plum, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1645, four sliding door panels (fusuma), ink, color, and gold leaf on paper, height 68 3/4 inches (174.6 cm), width of one panel 45 11/16 inches (116 cm), width of all four panels 15 feet 11 1/8 inches (485.3 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See Japanese art.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftA Painter ot the Kano School, (Japanese, active 1596-1614), Falcon on Oak Tree Watching Monkeys, six-panel folding screen; ink and light color on paper; no signature; interpolated jar-shaped kuninobu seal of Kano Eitoku (1543-90), Worcester Art Museum, MA.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAnonymous Town Painter (Japanese, active early 17th century), Willows by the Uji Bridge — first and second of a pair of six-panel folding screens; ink, color, and gold on paper, Worcester Art Museum, MA. See Edo period.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftKano Naonobu (Japanese, 1607-50), Tiger, left and right of a pair of six-panel folding screens; ink on paper; signature: Naonobu hitsu; seal: Fujiwara, Worcester Art Museum, MA.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightJapan, The Battles of Hogen and Heiji, Edo period (1615-1868), 17th century, pair of six-panel folding screens, ink, color, and gold leaf on paper, each 60 15/16 x 11 ft 8 inches (154.8 x 355.6 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See bird's-eye view and panorama.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftOgata Korin (Japanese, 1658-1716), Eight-Planked Bridge (Yatsuhashi), Edo period (1615-1868), 18th century, pair of six-panel folding screens, ink, color, and gold-leaf on paper, Each 70 1/2 x 12 feet 2 1/4 inches (179.1 x 371.5 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightMiyagawa Choshun (Japanese, 1682-1752), Pictures of Amuseuments at Cherry-Blossom-Viewing Time, left and right of a pair of six-panel folding screens, Kyoho period (1716-36), ink, color, and gold on paper; signature: Nihon e Miyagawa Choshun zu (on each screen); seal: Unidentified (left screen only), Worcester Art Museum, MA.

 

 

Watanabe Shiko (Japanese, Edo period, 1683-1755), Irises [detail], Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftYosa Buson (Japanese, 1716-83), Travelers on Horseback on a Mountain in Spring, 1770s, four-panel folding screen; ink, light colors, and gold on paper; signature: Shunseisha; seals: (upper) Shachoko, (lower) Sha Shunsei, Worcester Art Museum, MA.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightNagasawa Rosetsu (Japanese, 1754-99), Bamboo, 1790s, six-panel folding screen; ink on paper; no signature; seals: (upper) Nagasawa, (lower) Gyo, Worcester Art Museum, MA. See bamboo and nature.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftSakai Hoitsu (Japanese, 1761-1828), Cranes, two-panel folding screen; ink, colors, and gold on paper; signature: Hoitsu Kishin hitsu; seals: (upper) Oson, (lower) Monsen, Worcester Art Museum, MA.

 

see thumbnail to rightYokoi Kinkoku (Japanese, 1761-1832), Landscape, after 1810, six-panel folding screen; ink and light color on paper; signature: Kinkoku; seal: Kinkoku, Worcester Art Museum, MA.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftLockwood de Forest (American, 1850-1932), designer; made in New York/Ahmedabad, America/India, Screen, 1881-1890, teak, plaited matting, mixed metals, 65 x 69 3/4 x 1 3/4 inches (165.1 x 177.2 x 4.4 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

see thumbnail to rightSeraphin Soudbinine (French, 1870-1944), designer, Jean Dunand (French, 1877-1942), designer, "Fortissimo" Screen, 1925-26, lacquered wood; each panel: 98 x 35 inches (246.9 x 89.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See Art Deco.

 

 

Examples of a screen in the last sense:

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightTo create a "screenshot" on an Apple computer, type - shift - 3. Then look on your hard drive for files titled "Picture". Each screenshot will have been assigned a number in the order it was shot.

 

 

see thumbnail belowSome other shots of computer screens: one displaying a music editing application, two with games, and one with an engineering application.

 

 

Also see Japanese art and panorama.

 

 

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