ArtLex Art Dictionary

 

 

 

EExamples of Renaissance works of art by artists born after 1469, including Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528), Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475-1564), Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio) (Italian, 1483-1520), Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) (Italian [Venetian], c. 1485/90-1576), Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti) (Italian [Venetian], 1518-1594), and Giambologna (Giovanni da Bologna) (Italian, 1529-1608):

 

Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528), Portrait of Dürer's Father at 70, 1497, oil on wood panel, 51 x 40 cm, National Gallery, London.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAlbrecht Dürer, Self-Portrait at 26, 1498, oil on wood panel, 52 x 41 cm, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. Also see Dürer's two other self-portraits.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftAlbrecht Dürer, A Young Hare, 1502, 25 x 23 cm, and The Large Turf, 1503, 41 x 32 cm, both drawings in the collection of the Graphische Sammlung, Albertina, Vienna. See Northern Renaissance.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAlbrecht Dürer, The Large Turf, 1503, watercolor and gouache on paper, 41 x 32 cm, Graphische Sammlung Albertina, Vienna.

 

 

Albrecht Dürer, Adam and Eve, 1504, engraving, 9 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches (24.8 x 19.1 cm), Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

 

 

Albrecht Dürer, Christ Among the Doctors, 1506, oil on wood panel, 65 x 80 cm, Fundacion Coleccion Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAlbrecht Dürer, Virgin and Child with Saint Anne, 1519, oil and tempera on canvas, transferred from panel, 23 5/8 x 19 5/8 inches (60 x 50 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMichelangelo (born Michelangiolo Buonarroti) (Italian, 1475-1564), Madonna of the Stairs, 1489-92, marble bas-relief, 21 3/4 x 15 3/4 inches (height 55.5 cm), Casa Buonarroti, Florence. Perhaps the earliest of his sculptures to survive, Michelangelo conceived and executed this bas-relief when he was between fourteen and seventeen years old. To see numerous other sculptures by Michelangelo visit 1200 years of Italian Sculpture.

 

 

Michelangelo, The Battle of Lapiths and Centaurs (Centauromachia), 1491-92, marble relief, 33 1/4 x 35 5/8 inches (84.5 x 90.5 cm), Casa Buonarroti, Florence.

 

 

Michelangelo, Crucifix, 1492-94, wood, painted, height 53 inches (135 cm), Casa Buonarroti, Florence.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightMichelangelo, Bacchus, 1496-97, marble, height (with base) 6 feet 7 5/8 inches (195 cm), statue (without base) 6 feet 3/8 inch, Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence. There is a little Faun (or Satyr) eating grapes from a panther skin which Bacchus holds in his left hand. This work was carved in Rome, in 1496, for the collector Jacopo Galli.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMichelangelo, The Rome Pietà [see thumbnail to rightdetail of the faces of Christ and the Madonna], 1498-1500, marble, entire height 68 1/2 inches, maximum width of base 76 3/4 inches, maximum depth 27 1/8 inches, St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican, Rome. Carved in Rome for the French king Charles VIII's ambassador to Pope Alexander VI. See the article about Pietà.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMichelangelo, David , 1501-04, marble, height of statue 17 feet, base 6 feet x 1 foot 5 1/4 inches x 1 foot 2 7/8 inches, Galleria dell'Accademia, Florence. [see thumbnail to rightdetail: the head] Michelangelo began work on the colossal figure of David in 1501, and by 1504 the sculpture was in place outside the Palazzo Vecchio. The choice of David was supposed to reflect the power and determination of Republican Florence and was under constant attack from supporters of the usurped Medicis. In the nineteenth century the statue was moved to the Accademia. See fig leaf and pupil.

Stanford Computer Graphics Laboratory, Los Angeles, CA, has recently produced ultra-high-resolution digital images of Michelangelo's David and St. Matthew sculptures.

 

 

Michelangelo, The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist (the Doni Tondo), c. 1503-05, tempera on wood panel, diameter 47 inches (120 cm), Uffizi, Florence.

 

 

Michelangelo, Signorelli, Girlandaio, and others, fresco paintings in the Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome. Michelangelo repainted the chapel's ceiling between 1508 and 1512.

Details of the ceiling: Creation of the Sun and Moon, Delphic Sylph,
see thumbnail to rightCummic Sybil, and
See art restoration.

 

 

 

Michelangelo, The Dying Slave, Rome, 1513-1515, unfinished statue in marble, height 7 feet 6 1/8 inches (2.09 m), Louvre.

 

 

Michelangelo, The Rebellious Slave, Rome, 1513-1515, unfinished statue in marble, height 7 feet 5/8 inches (2.09 m), Louvre.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftMichelangelo, Tomb of Giuliano de'Medici, 1526-1534, marble, San Lorenzo, Cappella Medicea, Florence. In the niche is the statue of Giuliano Duke of Nemours who died in 1561. Below this, reclining on Giuliano's sarcophagus, are sculptures of Night (Notte) and Day (Giorno).

 

 

Night (La Notte) [detail], marble, length of the entire figure 76 3/8 inches, 24 3/4 inches deep.

 

 

Day (Il Giorno), marble, length 72 3/4 inches (185 cm), 34 1/4 inches deep.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightMichelangelo, Tomb of Lorenzo de'Medici, marble, San Lorenzo, Cappella Medicea, Florence. This includes a statue of Lorenzo, Duke of Urbino, who died in 1519, and of the allegoric figures of Twilight and Aurora. Lorenzo is 70 1/8 inches in height, 26 3/4 inches wide, 28 3/4 inches deep.

 

 

Twilight (Il Crepuscolo) [detail], marble, the entire figure's length 76 3/4 inches, 31 1/2 inches deep.

 

 

Dawn (L'Aurora), c. 1515, marble, length 81 inches, depth 24 3/8 inches. [details of the head of Twilight: one and another.]

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightMichelangelo, Crouching Boy, c.1530-1534, marble, height 54 cm, Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftGiorgione (Giorgio da Castelfranco) (Italian, 1477-1510), Judith, oil on canvas (transferred from panel), 56 1/2 x 26 inches (144 x 68 cm), Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRaphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi) (Italian, Marchigian, 1483-1520), Madonna and Child (Madonna Conestabile), 1502/3, tempera on canvas (transferred from panel), 7 x 7 inches (17.5 x 18 cm), State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRaphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), Madonna and Child Enthroned with Saints, altarpiece, c. 1504, tempera and gold on wood panel; main panel, overall 67 7/8 x 67 7/8 inches (172.4 x 172.4 cm), painted surface 66 3/4 x 66 1/2 inches (169.5 x 168.9 cm); lunette, overall 29 1/2 x 70 7/8 inches (74.9 x 180 cm), painted surface 25 1/2 x 67 1/2 inches (64.8 x 171.5 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. (On the Met's page, you can enlarge any detail.) See Madonna.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRaphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), St. George Fighting the Dragon, 1504-06, oil on wood panel, 11 1/8 x 8 3/8 inches (28.5 x 21.5 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

 

 

Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), St. George Fighting the Dragon, 1505, oil on wood panel, 12 x 10 1/4 inches (30 x 26 cm), Musee du Louvre, Paris.

 

 

Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), The small Cowper Madonna, c. 1505, oil on wood panel, 23 3/8 x 17 3/8 inches (59.5 x 44 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. See Madonna.

 

 

Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), Portrait of Maddalena Doni, c. 1506, oil on wood panel, 24 3/4 x 17 3/4 inches, Pitti Palace, Florence.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRaphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), The Holy Family (Madonna with the Beardless Joseph), 1506, tempera on canvas (transferred from panel), 28 1/2 x 22 1/2 inches (72.5 x 56.5 cm), Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), The School of Athens, 1510-11, fresco, height 25 feet, Stanza della Segnatura, Vatican, Rome. Many art historians believe that Raphael painted Plato the man with the white beard in the center of the picture — in a likeness to Leonardo da Vinci. The man who is seated, in the near left of center appears to be a likeness of Michelangelo. Euclid looks like the architect Bramante; another man resembles Raphael's painting master, Perugino; and there's even a self-portrait at the far right.

 

 

Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), Bindo Altoviti, c. 1515, oil on wood panel, 23 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches (60 x 44 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

 

 

Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio or Santi), Pope Leo X with two cardinals, 1518, oil on wood panel, 60 5/8 x 46 7/8 inches (154 x 119 cm), Uffizi, Florence.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightTitian (Tiziano Vecellio) (Italian, Venetian, c. 1488-1576), Madonna with saints and members of the Pesaro family, 1519-26, altar-painting: oil on canvas, 188 1/8 x 104 3/4 inches (478 x 266 cm), Church of Sta Maria dei Frari, Venice.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftTitian (Tiziano Vecellio), Venus with an Organist and a Dog, oil on canvas, Prado Museum, Madrid.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightTitian (Tiziano Vecellio), St. Sebastian, oil on canvas, 82 1/2 x 45 inches (210 x 115.5 cm), Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftTitian (Tiziano Vecellio), Danae, 1546/53, oil on canvas, 47 x 73 1/2 inches (120 x 187 cm), Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio), Portrait of a Friend of Titian (also known as Portrait of a Gentleman), c. 1550, oil on canvas, 35 1/2 x 28 1/2 inches, Legion of Honor, San Francisco.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightTitian (Tiziano Vecellio), Penitent Mary Magdalen, 1560s, oil on canvas, 46 1/2 x 38 inches (118 x 97 cm), Hermitage, St. Petersburg.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftTitian (Tiziano Vecellio) and Workshop, Venus and the Lute Player, c. 1565-70, oil on canvas, 65 x 82 1/2 inches (165.1 x 209.6 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. (On the Met's page, you can enlarge any detail.)

 

see thumbnail to rightCorreggio (Antonio Allegri) (Italian, 1489-1534), Head of Christ, about 1530, oil on wood panel, 11 1/4 x 9 1/16 inches (28.6 x 23 cm), J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, CA. See sfumato.

 

 

Polidoro da Caravaggio (Italian, 1490/1500-1543), Annunciation to Zachariah, pen and wash verso: Venus and Cupid, pen and ink, 4 1/2 x 9 3/8 inches (11.3 x 23.6 cm), Michael C. Carlos Museum.

 

 

Rosso Fiorentino (Giovanni Battista di Jacopo di Guasparre) (Italy, Florence, 1494-1540), Judith with the Head of Holofernes, c. 1538-40, red chalk, 9 1/8 x 7 3/4 inches (23.2 x 19.7 cm), Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

 

see thumbnail to leftAndrea Mantegna (Italian, 1495-1505), Adoration of the Magi, distemper on linen, stretcher size: 21 1/2 x 27 3/8 inches (54.6 x 69.2 cm), J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, CA.

 

 

Benvenuto Cellini (Italian, 1500-1571), The Nymph of Fontainebleau, Paris, 1542-1543, high relief bronze tympanum, 2.05 x 4.09 m, Louvre.

 

 

Leone Leoni (Italian, 1509-1590) and Pompeo Leoni (Italian, 1533-1608).

 

 

Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti) (Italian [Venetian], 1518-1594), St. George and the Dragon, c. 1555-8, oil on canvas, 62 x 39 1/2 inches (157.5 x 100.3 cm), National Gallery, London.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightTintoretto (Jacopo Robusti), Christ at the Sea of Galilee, c. 1575-80, oil on canvas, 46 x 66 1/4 inches (117 x 168.5 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

 

 

Paolo Caliari, "Veronese" (Italian, 1528-1588)

 

 

There is another page of examples of earlier Renaissance works of art — by artists born before 1470, including the works of Fra Angelico (Guido di Pietro da Mugello) (Italian, 1387-1455), Donatello (Italian, 1386-1466), Antonio Pisanello (Italian, before 1395-1455?), Giovanni Bellini (Italian, 1430?-1516), Sandro Botticelli (Italian, c. 1445-1510), Domenico Ghirlandaio (Italian, 1449-1494), Sebastiano Mainardi (Italian, 1450-1513), Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452-1519), and Tilmann Riemenschneider (German, c. 1460-1531).

 

 

Related Links:

 

 

Also see cinquecento, High Renaissance, quatrocento, and scumble.

 

 

 

 

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