MMinimalism - A twentieth century art movement and style stressing the idea of reducing a work of art to the minimum number of colors, values, shapes, lines and textures. No attempt is made to represent or symbolize any other object or experience. It is sometimes called ABC art, minimal art, reductivism, and rejective art.

Precursors to Minimalism include the Russian Suprematists, such as Kasimir Malevich (Russian, 1878-1935). Examples:

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightKasimir Malevitch, Black Cross, 1915, oil on canvas, 80 x 79.5 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris. See Russian art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftKasimir Malevitch, Black Square, c. 1923-1930, oil on plaster, 36.7 x 36.7 x 9.2 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris.

 

Examples of Minimalist work:

Listed chronologically by artist's birth year

 

Use ctrl-F (PC) or command-F (Mac) to search for a name

 

Barnett Newman (American, 1905-1970), The Third, 1962, oil on canvas, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN. See zip.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightAgnes Martin (American, 1912-2004), Untitled, 1963, red and violet ink and graphite on off-white wove paper, 33 x 33 cm (sheet), Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA.

 

 

Tony Smith (American, 1912-1981).

 

 

Ad Reinhardt (American, 1913-1967), Black Painting No. 34, 1964, oil on canvas, 60 1/4 x 60 1/8 inches (1.530 x 1.526 m), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. See Abstract Expressionism.

 

 

Anne Truitt (American, 1921-2004)

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightEllsworth Kelly (American, 1923-), Study for White Plaque: Bridge Arch and Reflection, 1951, cut-and-pasted black papers, 20 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches (51.4 x 36.1 cm) (irregular), Museum of Modern Art, NY.

 

see thumbnail to leftEllsworth Kelly, Eleven Panels, Kite II, 1952, oil on canvas, 80 x 280 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightEllsworth Kelly, Untitled, 1964, silkscreen print, 55.8 x 45.7 cm (image), 61 x 50.8 cm (sheet) inches, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftEllsworth Kelly, Yellow Red Curve, 1972, oil on canvas, 115 x 302 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris. See triangle.

 

see thumbnail to rightFrançois Morellet (French, 1926-), 6 chance divisions of 4 black and white squares from odd and even numbers generated by Pi, 1958, oil on wood, 80 x 80 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris. See pi.

 

 

Donald Judd (American, 1928-1994), Untitled, 1967, stainless steel and Plexiglas, ten units, 9 1/8 x 40 x 31 inches, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, TX. See more of Judd's work at the site of his Chinati Foundation. Also see rectangle and specific objects.

 

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail aboveSol LeWitt (American, 1928-), Untitled, 1971, intaglio print on paper, image: 15.9 x 37.5 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

see thumbnail to rightSol LeWitt, Two Open Modular Cubes/Half-Off, 1972, enamelled aluminum, 160.0 x 305.4 x 233.0 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

Sol LeWitt, Incomplete Open Cube #7-18, 1974, painted metal, Bayly Art Museum at the University of Virginia.

 

see thumbnail aboveSol LeWitt, Five Open Geometric Structures, 1979, painted wood, 92.0 x 6720 x 91.4 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

Sol LeWitt, Complex Form #4, 1987, painted aluminum, New Britain Museum of American Art, CT.

 

 

Sol LeWitt, 463 works in the collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA.

 

 

Robert Morris (American, 1931-)

 

 

Dan Flavin (American, 1933-1996), Icon VII (via crucis), 1962-64, fluorescent light and Masonite, 25 x 25 x 10 1/8 inches, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, TX. See light.

 

 

Carl Andre (American, 1935-), 144 Pieces of Zinc (144 Zinc Square), 1967, zinc plates, 144 x 144 x 3/8 inches (365.7 x 365.7 x 6.6 cm), Milwaukee Art Museum, WI.

 

 

Carl Andre, Tomb of the Golden Engenderers, 1976, western red cedar wood, x 274.3 [sic], Detroit Institute of Arts, MI. See wood.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftEva Hesse (American, born Germany, 1936-1970), Tomorrow's Apples (5 in White), 1965, enamel, gouache and mixed media on board, 65.4 x 55.6 x 15.9 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See Minimalism and Post-Minimalism.

 

 

Eva Hesse, Hang Up, 1966, acrylic on cord and cloth, wood, and steel, 182.9 x 213.4 x 198.1 cm, Art Institute of Chicago.

 

 

Eva Hesse, Accession II, 1967, galvanized steel and rubber tubing, 78.1 x 78.1 x 78.1 cm, Detroit Institute of Arts, MI.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftEva Hesse, Addendum, 1967, painted papier mâché, wood and cord, 12.4 x 302.9 x 20.6 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

see thumbnail to rightEva Hesse (American, born Germany, 1936-1970), Sans II, 1968, fiberglass, 38 x 170 3/4 x 6 1/8 inches (96.5 x 433.7 x 15.6 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, NY. See feminism and feminist art, fluted, and rectangle.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftEva Hesse, Contingent , 1969, cheesecloth, latex, fiberglass, installation (variable) 350.0 x 630.0 x 109.0 cm, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightFrank Stella (American, 1936-), Hyena Stomp, 1962, oil on canvas, 195.6 x 195.6 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See square.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftFrank Stella, Mas o Menos (More or Less), 1964, metallic powder in acrylic emulsion on canvas, 300 x 418 cm, Georges Pompidou Center, Paris.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightFrank Stella, Tahkt-I-Sulayman Variation II, 1969, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 240 inches, Minneapolis Institute of Arts. See protractor.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftFrank Stella, Double Gray Scramble, 1973, screenprint, composition: 23 3/8 x 43 1/8 inches (59.4 x 109.5 cm); sheet: 29 x 50 3/4 inches (73 x 128.9 cm); edition: 100; publisher and printer: Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles; collection Museum of Modern Art, NY. See concentric.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRichard Serra (American, 1939-), Prop, 1968, lead antimony alloy, 97 1/2 x 60 x 43 inches (247.7 x 152.4 x 109.2 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, NY.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRichard Serra, 2-2-1: To Dickie and Tina, 1969, 1994, lead antimony alloy, 132.0 x 349.0 x 132.0 cm, Tate Gallery, London.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRichard Serra, Five Plates, Two Poles, 1971, Cor-ten steel, 96 x 276 x 216 inches, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN.Richard Serra, Mozarabe, 1971, steel, x 76.2 inches wide, Detroit Institute of Arts, MI.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRichard Serra, Tilted Arc, 1981, Cor-ten steel, 12 x 120 feet, New York City. See arc.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRichard Serra, Trip Hammer, 1988, steel, 274.3 x 331.5 x 134.6 cm, Tate Gallery, London. See rectangle.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftRichard Serra, Torqued Ellipse IV, 1998, weatherproof steel, 12 feet 3 inches x 26 feet 6 inches x 32 feet 6 inches, (373.4 x 807.7 x 990.6 cm), Museum of Modern Art, NY.

 

Lynda Benglis (American, 1941-), Travel Agent, 1966/1977-78, pigmented beeswax and gesso on Masonite, 36 1/4 x 6 3/4 x 5 1/2 inches (92.1 x 17.1 x 14 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, NY.

 

Keith Sonnier (American, 1941-), Abaca Code-Circles, 1975/1976, hand-cast paper and stamping, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.Ross Bleckner (American, contemporary).

 

Tony Cragg (English, 1949-)

 

Peter Halley (American, 1953-), A Perfect World, 1993, acrylic, day-glo acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas, 90 x 147 3/16 inches, Broad Art Foundation. Halley's style and period of Minimalism is generally known as Neo-Geo.

 

Quote:

 

Related Links:

 

Also see communication, formalism, geometric, hard-edge, isms and -ism, postmodernism, and Post-Minimalism.

 

 
 
 
ArtLex Art Dictionary

http://www.artlex.com
Copyright © 1996-current year