jjewelry or jewels - The work of jewelers: ornaments or gems / gemstone such as necklaces, bracelets, or rings, typically made of precious metals set with gems or imitation gems.

The British spelling is jewellery.


Examples:

 

see thumbnail to rightEtruria, Set of jewelry, early 5th century BCE, late Archaic, gold, glass, rock crystal, agate, carnelian; length of necklace 14 3/16 inches (36 cm); diameter of disks 2 7/16 inches (6.1 cm); length of fibula 1 15/16 inches (5 cm); length of fibulae 1 5/8 inches (4.1 cm); length of pin 2 7/8 inches (7.3 cm); diameter of ring with youth intaglio 7/8 inches (2.2 cm); diameter of ring with Herakles intaglio 15/16 inches (2.4 cm); diameter of ring with bird intaglio 1 1/16 inches (2.7 cm); diameter of plain ring 31/32 (2.45 cm); diameter of ring with lion intaglio 7/8 inches (2.2 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See Etruscan art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftGreece, Temple Pendant with the Head of Athena Parthenos, first half of the 4th century BCE, gold, enamel, State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. See pendant.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightBosporan Kingdom (Black Sea Coast), in Greek style, Necklace (Pectoral), first half of the 4th century BCE, gold, enamel, diameter 18.4 cm, State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. See pectoral.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftGreek, Alexandria, Egypt, 220 BCE - 100 BCE, Hairnet, gold, garnet, and glass paste, 8 1/2 x 3 1/8 x 3 inches (21.5 x 8 x 7.5 cm), J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, CA.

 

 

see thumbnail to rightFrance, Département Somme, Arm Ring, 6th century CE, Frankish, diameter 6.8 cm, silver gilt, Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Berlin.

 

 

South America, Central Andes, North Coast, Chímu-Lambayeque, Pair of Earspools, Late Intermediate Period, CE 1000-1470, repoussé gold-copper alloy and silver alloy, diameter of disk 3 x 4 7/16 inches (7.5 x 11.1 cm), Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emery U, Atlanta, GA. See Pre-Columbian art.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to leftSpain, Caravel Pendant, 1580s-1590s, emeralds, gold, enamel, 9.3 x 6 cm, Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightThe Netherlands, Swan Pendant, 1590s, gold, enamel, pearl, diamonds, rubies, 9.2 x 5.9 cm, Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftÉvrard and Frédéric Bapst (French jewelers, Paris), Crown of the Duchess of Angoulême, 1819-1820, gold and gilded silver set with 40 emeralds and 1031 diamonds, Louvre. See crown.

 

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightRené Jules Lalique (French, 1860-1945), Necklace, c. 1895-1905, gold, enamel, Australian opal, Siberian amethysts; overall diameter 9 1/2 inches (24.1 cm); 9 large pendants: 2 3/4 x 2 1/4 inches (7 x 5.7 cm), 9 small pendants: 1 3/8 x 1 1/4 inches (3.5 x 3.2 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY. See Art Nouveau.

 

 

see thumbnail to leftJosef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956) for Wiener Werkstätte, Square Brooch, silver lattice, repoussé gold, and opal, c. 1905. See opalescence, and secession.

 

 

 

see thumbnail to rightDinka people, southern Sudan, Beaded Neck Ornament, early 20th century, a central band of patterned Venetian glass beads and brass cartridge cases, surrounded by blue glass beads, British Museum, London. The tradition among the Dinka is that this would have been worn by a man before his wedding,

 

 

 

Also see art careers, attribute, body art, cosmetic, costume, mehndi, pectoral, pendant, plaque, and polymer clay.

 

 

 

 

 

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